Places To Go In Vietnam

Places to go in Vietnam is a difficult question for many visitors because Vietnam is an astonishing mix of natural highlights and cultural diversity. Are you looking for places to go in Vietnam, but not sure where to go? It’s a wonderful country with friendly people, beautiful nature, interesting wildlife, architecture, history, and food.  The scenery ranges from jagged peaks seen from winding mountain passes down to verdant paddy fields painted every shade of green in the palette, while the nation's long history and amazing number of ethnic minorities mean that culture-vultures will find plenty to admire

Halong Bay
The karst seascape of Halong Bay is one of the world's most spellbinding sea views and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Thousands of limestone islands sit within this bay in the Gulf of Tonkin, eroded into jagged pinnacles by wind and water action over millennia. With the bay's scenery best seen by boat, this is prime cruising territory. Opt for at least an overnight tour to see Halong Bay's iconic views as a day trip doesn't do it justice. There are plenty of caves in the bay that can be entered including the Hang Sung Sot, with three mammoth caverns, and the Hang Dao Go, with superbly weird stalagmites and stalactites. For most people though, the highlight is simply cruising amid the karsts and soaking up the changing scenery of pinnacles as you pass by.

With its aqua-green water and cluster of limestone rocky outcrops rising from the water like sea dragons, Ha Long Bay resembles a scene from a fantasy story. Located about 130 km (80 miles) east of Hanoi in northern Vietnam, this otherworldly bay features more than 2,000 jungle-covered islands pitted with intriguing caves, grottoes, sinkholes and lakes. Many of the islands have been sculpted over the centuries by natural processes into fantastic formations.

Ho Chi Minh City

Next places to go in Vietnam is Saigon. Although Saigon was renamed to Ho Chi Minh City, travelers and locals alike often still refer to Vietnam’s largest city as Saigon. The energy and pace of Saigon are certainly more electric than in Hanoi. Saigon has the best nightlife in Vietnam with “bia hois” along the streets selling light, locally brewed beer for less than 50 cents each.

An abundance of historic sights are dotted around Saigon, including the Reunification Palace, the War Remnants Museum, and Notre Dame Cathedral. Water puppet shows are also a popular attraction.

The airport in Saigon is Vietnam’s largest and busiest, so it is best to check into flying into Vietnam.

For big city fans, no visit to Vietnam is really complete without a visit to Ho Chi Minh City, the buzzing and crazy commercial hub of the country. The streets are an insane clog of motorbikes and cars, the restaurant and cafe scene is incredibly cosmopolitan, and the shopping is the best you'll find in the country. At its center is Dong Khoi, a relatively small and easily navigable central district, which holds most of the city's sights. Here, you'll find the HCMC Museum, with a brilliant collection of artefacts that weaves together the story of the city, and the grand Notre Dame Cathedral, built in the late 19th century. Check out the old district of Da Kao nearby for some of the best surviving examples of the city's French colonial architecture and also to visit the Jade Emperor Pagoda with its dazzling array of Buddhist and Taoist religious iconography. Afterwards, the History Museum is a must-do for history fans with stacks of relics on display from various archaeological sites

For many visitors, the two big hitter attractions not to miss are just a little out of the center, along Nguyen Thi Minh Khai Street. The Reunification Palace, then known as Independence Palace, was the residence for South Vietnam's president. It's chiefly famous as the spot where North Vietnam's tanks stopped on 30 April 1975, officially ending the war. It's a completely fascinating place to visit complete with 1960s furnishings still in situ. Nearby is the War Remnants Museum, which although very obviously biased, paints a disturbing picture of the brutality of war and the many atrocities committed by US Forces during their Vietnam campaign.

Hue

Situated on the banks of the Perfume River in Central Vietnam, Hue once served as the imperial capital of the Nguyen dynasty. Today, the vestiges of this former glorious period are reflected in the city’s architecture, culture and cuisine, making it one of the best places to visit in Vietnam. Of the city’s monuments, the Citadel is the most famous. Once the seat of the Nguyen emperors, the Citadel is a sprawling complex of grand palaces, ornate temples, walls and gates Another important landmark on the river is the city’s official symbol, the Thien Mu Pagoda.

One of places to go in Vietnam, Hue is packed to the brim with relics from the reign of the 19th-century Nguyen emperors. Sitting along the banks of the gorgeous Perfume River, the Imperial Enclosure is a huge site set within walls that sprawl for 2.5 kilometers. While touring the grounds check out the gorgeous Ngo Mon Gate, the Thai Hoa Palace with its finely lacquered interior detailing, the Dien Tho Residence where the Queen Mothers would live, and the Halls of Mandarins with its preserved ceiling murals. A dazzling number of historic sites lie outside the Imperial Enclosure walls as well.

One of the nicest ways of visiting a collection of outlying sites is by taking a riverboat cruise on the Perfume River. A day cruise can take you to visit several royal tombs along with some pagodas. If you're short on time, the best tomb to visit is the Tomb of Tu Doc and the most important pagoda in the area is the Thien Mu Pagoda, with its tower that soars for 21 meters high.

Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park

Designated a Unesco World Heritage Site in 2003, the remarkable Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park contains the oldest karst mountains in Asia, formed approximately 400 million years ago. Riddled with hundreds of cave systems – many of extraordinary scale and length – and spectacular underground rivers, Phong Nha is a speleologists’ heaven on earth.

Beautiful Phong Nha Cave, which is closest to Phong Nha town and only accessible by dragon boat from the little jetty here. Dark Cave (Hang Toi) involves a zip line, a muddy exploration, a cold swim and a short kayak trip, while Paradise Cave is a huge dry cavern with a deceptively tiny entrance. The latter has mind-blowing stalactite and stalagmite formations, which can be viewed from a boardwalk. Other caverns, such as Hang Va and Hang En, require some demanding trekking.

One of the world's best caving destinations, World Heritage-listed Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park is a dramatic karst mountain formation honeycombed with huge caverns, which are home to superb stalactite and stalagmite displays. The most popular destination within the park is the Paradise Cave, which extends for a staggering 31 kilometers below ground. The yawning caverns here are truly spectacular. Tu Lan Cave is a "wet cave," and a visit here includes swimming through the cave-systems river. The other most popular excursion is to the Phong Nha Caves, where the interior is accessed by boat. You can access Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park from Son Trach.

Hoi An

Beautiful Hoi An is one of the best places to go in Vietnam, with bags of surviving historic architecture. The old town quarter is a joy to explore, packed to the brim with well-preserved merchant houses that hark back to Hoi An's trading center heyday of the 15th century, when the town was a major meeting point for Japanese and Chinese merchants who flocked here for the local silks. Plenty of the old merchant houses have been opened to the public, so you can get a taste of these times. The best is 17th-century Tan Ky House, with fascinating architectural and decorative elements.

Located off the coast of the South China Sea in South Central Vietnam,Hoi An is a beautiful, old city dating back 2,000 years to the Champa Kingdom. The city’s historic architecture, traditional culture and textiles make it a popular destination in Vietnam. At the heart of Hoi An is its atmospheric Old Town which is small enough to walk around easily. The narrow, winding lanes of the Old Town are lined with beautiful old architecture, traditional wooden houses and hundreds of tailor shops selling clothing, shoes, bags, souvenirs and custom-made services.

Although the word is out and the town stays busy, Hoi An is a favorite for many visitors to Vietnam. The atmosphere is simply unforgettable at dusk as swinging lanterns illuminate ancient, brick streets. Hoi An once served as an important trading port, but today it is most famous for tourism and the abundance of cheap tailor shops that will customize clothing to order.

Hoi An’s Ancient Town is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that attracts an ever-increasing number of tourists. The famous Japanese Bridge there is beautiful at night. Don’t miss your chance to try the rarest noodle dish in the world when visiting Hoi An.

Hoi An's major symbol is the delightful Japanese Bridge at the western end of Tran Phu Street, while nearby, the Assembly Hall of the Fujian Chinese Congregation is the old town's most highly decorated temple. There are numerous small pagodas and museums dotted about town, but Hoi An's true charm is found in simply rambling the old town streets admiring the well-preserved facades.

Sapa Countryside

Sapa Vietnam, one of the places to go in Vietnam, still has its inconvenient times that visitors should avoid. Since Sapa is a highland town, the way leading there is not easy to drive, especially in rain season, when the road surface is slippery and a litter bit dangerous. The wet season lasts for around 3 months, from June to September, and it is not a wise choice paying for sat that time. The period from June to September also coincides with high domestic season so you may expect to see more Kinh than other ethnic minorities. From September to mid-December, the weather is perfect for sight-seeing, photo-taking and camping trips, making it one of two best times to drop by Sapa Vietnam.

During this period the temperature ranges from 15 – 25 degree Celsius. It is not rainy season in Sapa so the trekking routes are dry and bear which means added opportunity to do longer treks, and possibly conquer Mount Fansipan. During the winter months, the temperature is much cooler and it is advised to bring a some warmer clothing (good waterproof jacket, sweater, wool socks). Also, during the winter months there are periods of light rain and heavy fog. This puts Sapa in the clouds and allows for some fantastic photo opportunities.

The verdant rice field countryside surrounding Sapa, bordered by the jagged peaks of the Hoang Lien Mountains (often still known by their French colonial era name of the Tonkinese Alps), are home to Vietnam's most beautiful rural vistas. The deep valleys here are home to a diverse mix of the country's ethnic minorities including the Hmong, Giay, and Red Dzao people while the rippling hills are terraced with rice fields and overlooked by the country's tallest peak, Fansipan Mountain. This is the top trekking destination in Vietnam, with oodles of options to trek or day hike between tiny villages and experience the staggering mountain views. Sapa itself is the main base here - an old French hill station and now a bustling and forever growing tourist center that is a stark contrast to the sumptuous tranquil countryside right on its doorstep.

Da Nang

Da Nang in Central Vietnam is one of the best places to go in Vietnam that is unfortunately skipped by so many travellers. Danang is a developing coastal city in the central part of Vietnam and is known as one of the largest cities alongside Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh city. Visiting Da Nang, you will be astounded by the amazing natural landscape, the friendly locals and a countless number of great attractions around the city. The city is surrounded by many great attractions such as Ba Na Hills, The Marble Mountains, My Son Sanctuary and many more…

Many people find themselves being short on time, and rush through Vietnam only aiming for the main destinations like Ho Chi Minh City and Ha Long Bay.

Such a shame, because lots of people just don’t realise that there are so many amazing things to do in Da Nang!

The common theme is to fly or catch the train into Da Nang and head straight to the fascinating UNESCO World Heritage Site of Hoi An, only 30km away. People often use the city simply as a transit stop, and they miss out on so much.

Even for those that know about what to see in Da Nang, this hip and thriving Vietnamese city proves to have a lot going for it. It definitely deserves catching some of your time.

The city of Da Nang is the third-largest in Vietnam and has had a tragic yet fascinating history.

Da Nang is home to an expat community and the infamous China Beach, a popular rest-and-relaxation spot for American G.I.s during the war. Although there aren’t a lot of things to do in the city, locals are friendly and hole-in-the-wall bars abound. Nearby Hoi An is much more touristy but also more charming for an overnight.

Mekong Delta

Mekong Delta lies at the very end of Vietnam, right under the southern central city of Vietnam, Ho Chi Minh City. The region is consisted of 12 provinces (Long An, Tien Giang, Ben Tre, Vinh Long, Tra Vinh, Hau Giang, Soc Trang, Dong Thap, An Giang, Kien Giang, Bac Lieu, Ca Mau) and one city is Can Tho.

Mekong is grand, fertile and primitive. Starts at Tibet, the river runs 3,000 miles through China, Myanmar, Laos, Thailand and Cambodia before entering Vietnam’s delta and out to the East Sea. Vietnamese call it “Song Cuu Long” which means “9 dragons” symbolizing the nine branches that created a vast delta region of 12 provinces and one city of the south. During thousands of years, this river has fed 60 millions of people on its way, enriched various regions and countries, fostered the culture diverse of Southeast Asia in general and Indochina in particular. There is no wonder why people call the river “Mother of Water”. 

The far south of Vietnam is where the mighty Mekong River finally finds its way to the sea in a maze of waterways that crisscross the floodplain. Incredibly lush, with paddy field vistas and mangroves, and full of local life, with chaotic floating markets to explore by boat, the delta is one of the most interesting regions for travelers to discover.

Colorful floating markets, fruit orchards, rice paddies, sugar cane groves, bird sanctuaries and quaint villages are all what draw many to the Mekong Delta in southwestern Vietnam. Nicknamed “Vietnam’s Rice Basket,” the Mekong Delta is an agricultural region made fertile by the maze of canals and streams fed by the Mekong River. Stretching from the Gulf of Thailand to Ho Chi Minh City, the Mekong Delta feeds more than a third of the country from its rich plantations, orchards, rice paddies and fish farms.

Can Tho is the most popular town to use as a base as it's close to the floating markets of Phong Dien and Cai Rang, while boat trips from Ca Mau allow you to explore the U Minh Mangrove Forest and Cau Mau Nature Reserve.

With the above amazing places to go in Vietnam, we hope that you will have a very memorable and meaningful trip with your friends and family when you travel to Vietnam. If you need new offers to your clients, there are definitely best places to go in Vietnam, please contact Dong Travel for a free quote

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